Loading Content...

Le Jongleur de Notre Dame (Book by MAURICE LENA)

(THE JUGGLER OF NOTRE DAME.)

MIRACLE PLAY IN THREE ACTS.

MUSIC BY    JULES MASSENET

English venton by CHARLES ALFRED BYRN£ .

As performed, for the first time in America at the

 

MANHATTAN OPERA HOUSE,  UNDER THE DIRECTION OP  OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN.

ENGLISH VERSION COPYRIGHTED, 1907, BY STEINWAY & SONS

 

CHARLES E. BURDEN, PUBLISHER, STEINWAY HALL

 

107-109 East hth Street

NEW YORK.

 

 

THE STORY

 

Is based upon the old medieval Miracle plays that flourished up t-> the

middle of the Sixteenth Century and which consisted of a quaint admixture of

the purely mundane, with the supernatural.

 

ACT I.

 

The people of one of the suburbs of Paris — Cluny, are celebrating May

Day on the Square in front of the Convent. Arrives Jean, a poor juggler at

whose old, worn out tricks they all laugh. They demand a drinking song and,

as it is the only way he can earn a penny, Jean first asking the Virgin’s pardon

sings it. In the midst of this irrupts the Prior, who scatters the riff-raff and

sternly threatens Jean with hell-fire if he does not mend his ways. Why doesn’t

he become a monk instead of a vagabond? Jean pleads for his liberty. Just

then Boniface, the convent cook, comes in with his donkey laden with provi-

sions. An empty stomach and the sight of all these good things, make Jean

come to a sudden resolution. He enters the Convent.

 

ACT II.

 

The Monks are working at their avocations. The Musician Monk is re-

hearsing a new Cantata for the Feast of the Virgin. Jean regrets that he can-

not praise the Virgin, too, because he doesn’t know Latin and, she wouldn’t

understand him in vulgar French. The monks get in a row over the compara-

tive superiority of their arts. The Sculptor Monk says his is the greatest. The

Painter contends for his. The Poet and the Musician join in the dispute and

nearly come to blows when the Prior orders them all to the chapel to practise

humility. Jean deplores his ignorance to Boniface complaining that he can “do

 

 

 

nothing to please the Virgin. Boniface tells him a story how once the most

humble of flowers saved the life of Jesus when pursued by the King child-killer.

Jean is convinced, at last, that his humble prayers — even in French — may reach

as high as those of the proudest.

 

ACT III.

 

The Painter Monk is taking a satisfied glance at his picture of the Virgin,

over the high altar, when he sees Jean enter with his juggler’s outfit. Puzzled,

the monk goes to notify the Prior. Jean tells the Virgin that, as he knows

nothing else, he will go through his whole performance in her honor. Now

and then he interrupts himself to tell her that some of his songs are hardly

appropriate for her ears, but that he means to be entirely respectful. The Prior

comes in unseen by Jean and watches his performance. He is greatly scandal-

ized but is restrained from interfering by Boniface. The other monks come in

and, when they see Jean going through his dance, cry Sacrilege ! Just as they

can contain themselves no longer the face of the Virgin in the picture is seen

to grow animated and her arms are extended toward Jean, now deep in prayer.

Miracle ! they all cry and as they kneel about Jean a great light envelops the

figure of the Virgin, angels surround her and celestial voices are heard. Jean,

murmuring that, at last he understands Latin, dies in the Prior’s arms.

 

 

 

PERSONAGES.

 

Jean, the Juggler. The Sculptor Monk.

 

Boniface, Cook of the Abbey The Poet Monk.

 

The Prior. The Painter Monk.

The Musician Monk.

 

 

 

it i j JucviU ■ + *< ■

 

 

 

” ‘ ■ ‘f . -<

 

 

 

‘ /

 

 

 

/

 

 

 

>Vu<-fc/-. Xv\^ Q^€-C*aX_-

 

 

 

Le Jongleur de Notre Dame

 

 

 

ACTE PREMIER*

 

(La place de Cluny au XIV e sikcle;

au milieu de la place, Vorme tradi-

tionnel, et sous Vorme, un banc. On

apercoit la facade de Vabbaye avec

une statue de la Vierge au-dessus

de la porte. C’est le premier jour

du mois de Marie, et jour de

marche. Des filles et des garcons

dansent la bergerette. Les mar-

chands sont a leurs places.)

 

/Bourgeois, Bourgeoises, Cheval-

iers, Clercs, Payans, Paysannes,

Gueux vont et viennent; Mar-

chands, Marchandes, d leurs

places.)

 

La Foule.

 

Pour Notre-Dame des cieux

Dansez la bergerette.

Oh! Pierrot! ohe! Pierrette!

Voici le mai gracieux,

Dansez la bergerette ;

Et pour le dauphin Jesus

Faites un tour de plus.

 

 

 

» Marchands et Marchandes.

 

Poireaux, navets, pruneaux de Tours !

A la f raise nouvelle!

Fromage de creme! Choux Wanes!

Sauce verte, achetez la bonne sauce

verte !

 

s Un Moine Crieur.

Les Pardons sont au grand autel.

 

(On entend au loin un air de vible qui

va se rapprochant.)

 

 

 

Tous.

Un jongleur, un jongleur!

 

 

rVoix Di verses.

Comme une sauterelle

Le refrain vif sautille! il approche!

 

un jongleur!

Noel, c’est un jongleur!

II va nous dire une chanson nouvelle,

Nous faire un tour nouveau,

Sa plus neuve grimace.

 

Tous.

f*- Le voici. Place, place !

 

Jean (il entre en jouant de la vicle;

 

s f arret ant).

 

Place au Roi des jongleurs!

 

(II est maigre, have, de pauvre equi-

page. Deception ginerale, mur-

mures.)

 

 

 

<

 

 

 

t

 

 

 

VOIX DlVERSES.

 

 

 

Silence! Entendez-vous ? C’est un

accord de viele.

 

 

 

Tous.

 

Le roi n’est pas tres beau,

Roi de piteuse mine.

 

v’Un Loustic (annoncant).

Sa majeste le Roi Famine !

 

(Quclqites rires.)

 

 

 

Jean.

 

Attention! avancez… reculez… Atten-

tion!

Ecoutez tous, chevaliers et manants,

Jeunes et vieux, betes et gens,

Dames au mignard sourire.

“Sages clercs qui savez lire,”

Bancroches, bosssu, ivrognes, voleurs,

Ecoutez Jean, Roi des jongleurs!

 

(Danse.)

 

 

 

 

Le Jongleur de Notre Dame

 

 

 

FIRST ACT*

 

(The Lquare of Cluny in the XIV

century. Centre of Square, under

the traditional plane tree, a bench.

We perceive the front of the abbey

with a statue of the virgin over the

door. It is the first day of the

month of Marie, a market day. Girls

and boys dance. The sellers are at

their ft aces.)

 

(Citizens and their ladies, Knights,

clerks, peasants and their women,

and common people go and come;

sellers and their wives at their

stalls.)

 

The Crowd.

 

For our lady of Heaven

Dance the shepherd step,

Oh Pierrot, oh Pierrette.

Here is gracious May,

Dance the shepherd step

And for the dauphin Jesus

Go on doing more.

 

Sellers and Their Wives.

 

Leeks, turnips and prunes of Tours,

And fresh strawberries,

Cream cheese, white cabbage.

Green sauce, buy the good green

 

sauce.

 

A Crier Monk.

Indulgences are at the great altar.

 

(In the distance an air of viele getting

nearer. )

 

Divers Voices.

 

Silence, do vou hear? It is the

sound of viele.

 

 

 

All.

A juggler, a juggler.

 

Divers Voices.

Like a grasshopper

 

Jumps the lively refrain — he comes,

a juggler! #

 

Praise be, ’tis a juggler.

He will give us some new song

Or turn us some new trick.

Or pull us some new face.

 

All.

He’s here, make room, make room !

 

Jean (he comes in playing; stops).

Room for the king of jugglers.

 

(He is thin, poorly set up. General

deception, murmurs.)

 

All.

 

The King is not handsome,

A King of piteous mien.

 

Man of the People.

His Majesty, King Famine.

 

(A few laughs.)

 

Jean.

 

Attention! come forward… go back…

 

attention !

Listen all, knights and villains.

Young and old, beasts and men.

Ladies of the gentle smile,

Learned clerks who know to read,

Lame men, humpbacks, drunkards,

 

thieves.

List to Jean, king of jugglers!

 

(All sing and daft-‘

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

/ Gentil Roi, choisis ta Reine,

Lanturli, virelonlaine,

Choisis ta reine, beau Roi,

Lanturli Ion la…

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

(Interrompant la ronde.)

 

Attention !

 

Mais, dans ma sebile d’abord,

Mes doux amis, un peu de menuaille.

 

(A quelqu’un qui lui donne.)

 

Jesus vous le rende, seignor.

 

(Avec tristesse, en regardant la sebile.)

 

Vieille monnaie, ah ! rien qui vaille…

 

(Reprenant son boniment.)

 

J’ Attention!

 

/ Voulez-vous tours de jonglerie.

 

I Voire de sorcellerie !

 

I Oncques sur terre ne vit-on

 

Plus dextre a jongler de baton

 

D’ecuelles et de boules.

 

  • (Rires dedaigneux.)

 

s Je sais tirer des oeuf s d’un chapeau !

 

1

 

! Tous.

 

: Cest enfantin… vieux jeu… Va-t’en

 

tjraire les poules !

 

i

 

*-— Jean.

 

Je sais la danse des cerceaux.

 

(II esquisse lourdement un pas de

danse.)

 

Tous.

 

Que de grace legere !

 

Les filles et les garcons forcent le

jongleur & danser avec eux.)

 

Tous.

 

Choisis ta reine, beau roi,

Lanturli Ion la.

 

 

 

 

Jean (aprds s f etre degagi).

 

\ La paix, folles et f ous !

 

(Continuant le boniment.)

 

Messeigneurs, pour vous plaire,

 

Je vais chanter un beau Salut d’amour !

 

 

 

Marchands.

Poireaux, navets !

 

 

 

Un Autre Groupe.

Pruheaux de Tours!

 

Jean (qui commence a desesperer).

 

Eh bien ! chant de bataille,

Olifant, tambour et clairon,

Hennissements sous Teperon,

Estoc at taille !

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Non, non.

 

 

 

Jean.

Je sais Roland.

 

Marchands.

 

Fromage de creme, choux blancs !

 

(Rires.)

 

Jean.

Je sais Berthe aux grands pieds.

 

Plusieurs Voix.

 

Non, non, trop vieille histoire.

 

(La ronde rcprend.)

 

Jean (essay ant de dominer le

vacarme).

 

Renaud de Montauban.

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Non, non.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Charlemagne.

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Non, non.

 

 

 

Pepin.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Rires.)

 

 

 

Un Loustic (imitant le cri de la rue)

 

Peaux d’lapin!

 

(Rires f tumult e.)

 

ous (par groupes divers).

Dis-nous plutot une chanson a boire.

 

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Pieity King, choose your Queen,

Lanturli, virelonlaine

Choose your queen, good king,

Lanturli Ion la…

 

(Interrupting the dance.)

 

Attention !

 

But first in my cup

 

My gentle friends, a little grist.

 

(to one who gives.)

 

Jesus return it to you, lord.

 

(Sadly, looking at cup.)

 

kn old coin, nothing worth.

 

(Continuing his jollying.)

 

Attention !

 

Would you have a turn at jugglery.”

 

Or else of sorcery.

 

No one lives on earth

 

More dextrous at juggling the stick

 

Or cups and balls.

 

(Laughs of scorn.)

 

I can draw eggs from a hat.

 

All.

 

Tis childish… old game… go milk

*hickens !

 

Jean.

 

I know the hoop dance.

 

(He dances heavily.)

 

All.

What a lightsome grace.

 

( The boys and girls make the juggler

dance with them.)

 

All.

 

Choose your queen, fine king.

Lanturli Ion la.

 

Jean (after getting away).

 

Peace you fool boys and girls!

 

(Continuing the jollying.)

 

My lords to please you I’ll sing a

fine Love’s Salvation.

 

 

 

The Sellers.

Leeks, turnips !

 

 

 

Other Sellers.

Prunes from Tours !

 

Jean (who begins to despair).

 

Well then! song of battle

Oliphant, drum and trump,

 

Neighings under the spur,

Give and take.

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

No, no.

 

 

 

Jean.

I know Roland.

 

Sellers.

Cream cheese, white cabbage.

 

(Laughter.)

 

Jean.

I know Bertha of the big feet

 

Several Voices.

 

No, no, too old a story.

 

(Dance goes on.)

 

Jean (trying to dominate the noise).

Renaud de Montauban.

 

 

 

No, no.

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Charlemagne.

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

No, no.

 

 

 

Jean,

 

 

 

Pepin.

 

 

 

(Laughter.)

 

 

 

Man of the People (imitating street

 

cry).

 

Rabbit skin!

 

(Laughter, tumult.)

 

All (in groups).

Give us rather a drinking song.

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Tous.

Tres bien ! Vivat ! Tres bien !

 

Un Ivrogne.

In vino Veritas.

 

Un Groupe.

Dis-nous le Credo de l’lvrogue.

 

Un Chevalier.

Le Te Deum de THypocras.

 

Tous.

Le Gloria de Rouge-Trogne.

 

Jean (proposant timidement).

V Alleluia du Vin ?

 

Tous (avec joie).

L’Alleluia du Vin !

 

 

 

Jean (se toumant, les mains jointes,

vers la statue de la Vierge).

 

Pardonne-moi, Sainte Vierge Marie,

Et vous, Jesus, doux enfancon.

Je vais chanter sacrilege chanson:

Mais if faut bien gagner sa vie.

La faim dans mes entrailles crie,

Et si mon coeur est bon chretien,

Pourquoi mon ventre est-il paien ?

 

Touis (rcclamant la chanson).

L’Alleuia du Vin !

 

Jean (il prelude sur son instrument).

 

Pater noster. Le vin, c’est Dieu, c’est

Dieu le pere,

 

Qui descend du trefonds des c|ieux,

Culotte de velours soyeux,

Tout au long de mon cou pieux,

Quand je vide mon verre.

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Alleluia !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

Alleluia! Chantons 1′ Alleluia du

Vin!

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Alleluia !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Ave. Venus la belle aux galants dit:

“Compere,

 

La nuit encor plus que le jour,

Bois le vieux vin, philtre d’amour;

On a le coeur chaud comme four,

Quand on vide son verre.”

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Alleluia !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Alleluia! Chantons 1* Alleluia du

Vin!

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Alleluia !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Credo. Ne buvez d’eau, breuvage

deletere.

 

A buveur d’eau, Tantre infernal!

Mais pour qu’i mon nez triomphal

Le Ciel dise: “Entrez, cardinal,”

Vidons encore un verre!

 

 

 

Tous.

 

 

 

Alleluia !

 

 

 

 

(La porte de Vabbaye s’ouvre brusque-

men t. Le Prieur parait sur les

marches.)

 

 

 

Tous.

C’est le Prieur… Fuyons!

 

Le Prieur.

Hors d’ici, troupe infame!

 

 

 

(Tous s f enfuient f sauf Jean interdit.

— A JeanJ

 

Et toi, vil baladin, pour mieux damner

ton ame,

 

Viens-tu done insulter jusque dans ce

couvent

 

Notre mere Marie et son divin En-

fant !

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

All.

Very good! Hurrah! very good.

 

A Drunkard.

In vino Veritas.

 

A Group.

Give us the Credo of the Drunkard.

 

A Knight.

The Te Deum of the Hypocras.

 

All.

The Gloria of Rouge-Trogne.

 

Jean (proposing timidly).

The Hallelujah of Wine?

 

All (with joy).

The Hallelujah of Wine!

 

Jean (turning and joining hands to

 

the Virgin).

 

Forgive holy Virgin Mary,

And you, Jesus, gentle child.

I will sing a sacrilege song;.

But Fve got to earn my bread.

Hunger in my entrails knaws,

And if my heart is Christian,

Why is my belly pagan ?

 

All (calling for song).

The Hallelujah of Wine !

 

Jean (preluding on his instrument).

 

Pater Noster — Wine the gods do

 

richly cherish

When from Heaven they descend,

Clad in joyful raiment

All the length of my neck

When I drain my glass.

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

Hallelujah !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Hallelujah! Sing the Hallelujah

 

cf Win*

 

 

 

Hallelujah !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Ave. Venus to the gallant says:

 

“Good fellow,

The “night even more than the day,

Drink the old wine, philtre of love;

One’s heart is as hot as an oven,

When one drains one’s glass.”

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

Hallelujah !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Hallelujah ! Sing the hallelujah of

Wine!

 

 

 

All.

 

 

 

Hallelujah !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Credo. Drink no water, a damaging

 

drink —

To drinkers of water the eternal

 

abyss !

But that to my nose triumphant

Heaven shall say : “Enter, cardinal !”

Let’s drain one more glass!

 

All.

Hallelujah !

 

(The door of the Abbey opens vio-

lently. The Prior appears on the

steps.)

 

All.

‘Tis the Prior… Let us fly.

 

The Prior.

 

Out of this, infamous rabble.

 

(All escape excepting Jean, amazed.

To JeanJ

 

And thou, vile songster, to better

damn thy soul,

 

Com’st thou to insult even in this

convent

 

Our mother Mary and her Child di-

vine!

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Jean (tombant a genoux).

Grace, mon Pere, .grace!

 

Le Prieur.

Detestable et maudite race !

 

Jean.

Oh! mon Pere, pitie!

 

Le Prieur.

 

Ne vois-tu pas Satan

Dont le poing vert brandit Tecarlate

 

tridant ?

II t’enfourche, il t’emporte.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Grace !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Pour t’engloutir, void — flammes et

 

fer,

Larmes et grincements — void s’ouvrir

 

la porte

Formidable d’Enfer!

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Pitie !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Tremble !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Pitie !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

L’enfer!

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Grace !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

L’enfer!

 

 

 

Jean (comme foudroye, etendu tout

dc son long a terre).

 

Ah ! je brule ! Ah ! je meurs…

 

(A genoux).

 

 

 

Ah! mon pere, pardon…

 

(Se tratnant vers la Vierge.)

 

Pardon, pardon, Marie,

Voyez mes pleurs !

 

(II sanglote.)

 

 

 

II pleure… Un peu de foi, dans cette

ame fletrie,

 

Pale rose d’hiver, va-t-il done re-

fleurir ? ___ _____ — ^ mmmm _ mmmmm

 

(A Jean.,

 

 

 

Ton nom?

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

C’est le nom d’un saint cher a la

Vierge.

 

(Montr ant la Vierge.)

 

Ce pardon de Marie, on peut le con-

 

querir.

Tu seras pardonne, si, brulant comme

 

un cierge,

Par fume comme un encensoir,

Ton coeur a son autel, sans retard, des

 

ce soir,

Abjure ce metier immonde,

Si, plein d’un repentir fervent

Et secouant au seuil la poussiere du

 

monde,

Tu deviens, des ce soir, mon frere en

 

ce couvent.

 

Jean (les mains jointes vers la *

Vierge).

 

Dame des cieux,

Vous savez bien, Jesus le sait de meme,

De quel amour tendre et devotieux

Jean, le pauvre jongleur, vous aime…

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Eh bien?

 

 

 

, – Jean.

 

Mais renoncer, quand je suis jeune

 

encor,

Renoncer a te suivre, 6 Liberte, ma

 

mie,

Insoucieuse fee au clair sourire d’or!…

 

C’est Elle que mon coeur pour mai-

tresse a choisie

 

 

 

s

 

 

 

LE TONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

Jean (on his knees).

Mercy, oh father, mercy!

 

The Prior.

Detestable and cursed race!

 

Jean.

Oh! my father, mercy!

 

The Prior.

 

See’st thou not Satan

 

Whose green fist brandishes the

 

scarlet trident?

He will pierce and carry thee away.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Mercy !

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

To engulf thee, here, flames and

 

iron

Tears and crunchings — here opens

 

the gate

Of formidable Hell !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Pity!

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Tremble !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Pity!

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Hell!

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Mercy!

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Hell!

 

 

 

Jean (as if thunderstruck, stretched

on the ground).

 

Ah, I am burning ! Ah, I die !

 

(On his knees.)

 

 

 

Ah, my father pardon…

 

(Dragging himself toward the Vir-

gin-)

 

Pardon, pardon, Mary,

Witness my tears.

 

(He sobs.)

 

The Prior (aside).

 

He weeps… A little faith, in this

withered heart,

 

Pale rose of winter, will it bloom

again ?

 

(To Jean.)

 

Thy name?

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Jean!

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

‘Tis the name of a saint dear to the

virgin.

 

(Pointing to the Virgin.)

 

This pardon of Mary it may be

conquered.

 

Thou’lt be pardoned if, burning as

a taper and perfumed as a censer,

 

Thy heart at her altar without fail,

from this night,

 

Abjures this filthy trade.

 

If with fervent repentance,

 

And shaking at the sill the dust of

the world

 

Thou becomest, from to-night, my

brother in this convent.

 

Jean (hands joined to the Virgin).

 

Lady of Heaven,

 

You well know, and Jesus knows it

too,

 

With what love tender and devo-

tional

 

Jean, the poor juggler, adores you

 

 

 

  • •4

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Well then?

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

But renounce, when I am still young,

Renounce to follow thee, oh Liberty,

 

beloved

Careless fay with clear golden smile!…

Tis she my heart for mistress has

 

chosen ;

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Cheveux au vent, rieuse, EUe me

 

prend la main

Et m’entraine au hasard de Theure et

 

du chemin.

L argent des eaux, Tor de la moisson

 

blonde,

Les diamants des nuits, par Elle sont

 

a moi!

Par Elle j’ai TEspace, et T Amour, et

 

le Monde;

Le gueux, par Elle, devient roi !

Par son charme divin, tout me rit, tout

 

m’enchante.

Je vais, et je respire, et je reve, et je

 

chante,

Et, pour accompagner le vol de ma

 

chanson,

Le concert des oiseaux petille au vert

 

buisson…

Maitresse gracieuse, et sceur que j’ai

 

choisie,

Faut-il que je vous perde, 6 mon royal

 

tresor,

O Liberte, ma mie,

Insoucieuse fee au clair sourire d’or!

 

Le Prieur.

 

Belle maitresse

 

En verite !

Redoute, pauvre sot, la mortelle ca-

 

resse

De sa mensongere beaute.

 

Jean.

Printemps sourit dans son cortege.

 

Le Prieur.

 

N’y vois-tu pas THiver, et la Bise,

et la Neige?

 

Jean.

Sa jeunesse est en fleur.

 

Le Prieur.

 

Mais bientot sera vieux son amant

le jongleur.

 

Jean (regardant son bagage de

jongleur).

 

Et vous, balles, cerceaux, vieux amis

 

pleins de z&le,

Va-t-il vous jeter \k, votre maitre

 

infid«e?

 

(S’adressant d sa vikle.)

 

 

 

Toi dont Tame chantait, docile, sous

ma main…

 

Le Prieur.

 

Garde-les et va-t’en mourir de faim,

Sans confesseur, dans un fosse, gue-

 

nille infame…

Mais le couvent, c’etait le salut de ton

 

ame,

Le salut de ton corps.

 

(Souriant.)

 

En careme, sans doute, haricots, har-

 

engs saurs ;

Mais aux fetes carillonnees.

Ah ! les plantureuses journees !

 

Tiens, regarde plutot!

 

/’Boniface parait, montc sur un ane

qu’un frere lai tient par la bride.

Vane est aussi charge de deux

paniers, Fun contenant des fleurs,

Vautre des victuailles et des bou-

teilles.)

 

Cuisinier sans egal,

 

Le frere Boniface arrivant de sa quete,

 

Glorieux, souriant, apporte pour la

 

fete

Tout un regal.

 

Boniface (prenant a mesure, dans

les corbeilles, fleurs et provisions).

 

Pour la Vierge d’abord, void les fleurs

qu’Elle aime :

 

Rose, anemone, heliantheme,

Et voici la pervenche encor,

Le troene et le bassin d or.

Pour la Vierge d’abord, voici les fleurs

 

qu’Elle aime.

Et pour les serviteurs de Madame

Marie,

Voici des oignons nouvelets,

Voici des poireaux verdelets,

Voici du cresson de orairie.

 

 

Choux veloute, sauge fleurie…

Cest pour les serviteurs de Madame

 

Marie.

Sainte Vierge, le beau chapon !

Mon Pere, s’il vous plait, soupesez ce

jambon…

 

Andouillettes, quartier de hure,

Cervelas, saucisse, boudin,

Voici de la belle salure ;

Rien de tel pour se mettre en vin !

Du vin, nous en avons, et quel vin

delectable !

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

Hair in the wind laughing, She takes

 

my hand,

She drags me on chance of the hour

 

and the road.

The silver of the waters, the gold of

 

the blond harvest,

The diamonds of the nights, through

 

Her are mine!

I have space through Her, and Love

 

and the World,

The villain, through Her, becomes

 

king!

By her divine charm, all smiles on

 

me, all enchants,

And, to accompany the flight of my

 

song.

The concert of the birds snaps in the

 

green bush.

Gracious mistress and sister I have

 

chosen,

Must I now lose you, oh my royal

 

treasure.

 

Oh Liberty, my beloved,

Careless fay of the golden smile!

 

The Prior.

 

Fine mistress,

 

Forsooth !

 

Fear, poor fool, the mortal caress

 

Of her deceitful beauty.

 

Jean.

Spring smiles in her train.

 

The Prior.

 

Dost not see Winter, the Storm and

the Snow ?

 

Jean.

Her youth is in flower.

 

The Prior.

 

But soon will be old, her lover, the

juggler.

 

Jean (looking at his juggler’s outfit).

 

And you, balls, hoops, old friends full

of zeal,

 

Shall he throw you away, your un-

faithful master?

 

(Addressing his instrument).

 

Thou whose docile soul, sang under

my hand…

 

 

 

The Pki:>r.

 

Keep them and go. Go die of hunger.

 

Without confession, in a ditch, infa-

mous ragster;

 

Why the convent ’twas the saving of

thy soul,

 

The saving of thy body.

 

(Smiling).

 

In Lent, no doubt, beans and salt

 

herring ;

But, on chimed holidays,

Ah ! the happy days !

 

Come, look rather.

 

(Boniface appears, mounted on a don-

key that a lay brother holds by the

bridle. The donkey also carries two

baskets, one containing flowers, the

other znctuals and bottles.)

 

Cook without equal,

 

Brother Boniface coming from his

 

quest,

Glorious, smiling, bringing for the

 

feast

A load of good things.

 

Boniface (taking one after another

from the baskets, flowers and pro-

visions).

 

For the Virgin first, here are the flow-

ers she loves:

 

Carnations, lilacs, forget-me-nots,

 

Violet, woodbine and lily,

 

Rose, anemones, heliotrope.

 

And here is the pervense, too —

 

The silver sprig and bleeding heart.

 

For the Virgin first, here are the flow-

ers she loves.

 

And for the servants of Madame

Marie,

 

Here are Spring onions,

 

And green leeks,

 

Here is cress from the stream,

 

Velvety cabbage, flowery sage

 

For the servants of Madame Marie.

 

Holy Virgin, the beautiful capon!

 

My father, if you please, weigh this

ham…

 

Chitterlings, a quarter of boar.

 

Cervelas, sausage, blood pudding,

 

Here is a fine salted piece;

 

Nothing so good to put in wine !

 

Wine, we have some, and how delect-

able.

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Voyez comme il scintille au cristal du

 

flacon ;

Doux Jesus, c’est du vieux Macon !

 

Pour la Vierge,

 

Voici des fleurs

 

Et ce beau cierge !

Et voici pour ses humbles serviteurs.

 

(On en tend la cloche du dejeuner dans

Vinterieur de I’abbaye; puis les voix

des moine s au reject oire re extant le

Benedicite.)

 

Voix Des Moines.

 

Une Voix.

Benedicite.

 

Tous Les Moines.

Benedicite.

 

Une Voix.

 

Nos et ea quoe sumus sumpturi bene-

dicat dextera Christi.

 

Tous.

Amen!

 

Une Voix.

 

In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus

Sancti.

 

Tous.

Amen!

 

Boniface.

 

Le Benedicite, mon Pere. A table,

a table ;

 

Et qu’un bon dejeuner.

 

(Montrant ses provisions.)

 

Nous prepare au diner.

 

Le Prieur (a Jean, avec un geste

 

d y invitation.)

A table !

 

Jean (comme en extase, mains beate-

ment jointes.)

A table!

 

Tous Trois (avec gestes differents).

A table !

 

(Le Prieur, Boniface, le Frere Lai

avec Vane, se dirigent vers VentrSe

de Vabbaye. Jean les suit, encore

hesitant, mais comme entraxne par le

parfum des victuailles. Arrivi au

seuil, il revient sur ses pas pour

prendre son bagage de jongleur,

qu’il emporte en cachette. Avant

cTentrer, il fait aux pieds de la

Vierge une humble ginuflexion.)

 

 

 

ACTE DEUXIEME.

 

 

 

(A Vabbaye, dans la salle d f etudes, qui

s’ouvre sur le jardin du couvent.

Tables, pupitres, chevalets. Se de-

tachant bien en vue, nouvellement

achevee, une statue de la Vierge,

dans une attitude mystique d’indul-

gence et d’amour qu’un moine est

en train de colorier. Groupes au-

tour du Moine Musicien, les

moines achkvent de reptter sous sa

direction un hymne a la Vierge qu’il

a compose pour la circonstance;

c’est le matin de V Assomption.)

 

Tous Les Moines.

 

(Le moine musicien dirige Vensemwie

vocal en y melant sa voix.)

 

Ave coeleste lilium,

Ave rosa speciosa,

Ave mater humilium

Superis imperiosa.

In hac valle lacrymarum

Da robur, fer auxilium.

 

Jean (revant a Vecart).

La cuisine est bonne au couvent.

 

Moi qui ne dinais pas souvent,

 

Je bois bon vin, je mange viandes

 

grasses.

 

Jour glorieux !

La Vierge aujourd’hui monte aux

 

cieux,

Et pour elle on repete un cantique de

 

graces.

 

(Avec tristcsse.)

Un cantique en Latin!

 

Reine des anges,

O vous, a qui je dois grasse viande et

 

bon vin,

Je voudrais avec eux celebrer vo$

 

louanges.

 

Helas ! je ne sais pas chanter Latin.

 

Le Prieur (entrant).

 

Mes freres, e’est tres bien.

 

(Au moine musicien).

Compliments a Tauteur.

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

See how it sparkles through the flask’s

 

crystal.

Gentle Jesus, it is old Macon !

 

For the Virgin

Here are flowers

And this handsome taper.

And this is for her humble servants.

 

(The breakfast bell rings from interior

of the abbey; then the voices of the

monks in the refectory reciting the

Benedicite.)

 

(Voices of the Monks.)

 

 

 

A Voice.

 

 

 

Benedicite.

 

 

 

All the Monks.

 

Benedicite.

 

A Voice.

 

Nos et ea quce sumus sumpturi bene-

dicat dexterce Christi.

 

All.

Amen!

 

A Voice.

 

In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus

Sancti.

 

All.

Amen\

 

Boniface.

 

The Benedicite, my father. To the

 

table ; to the table ;

And that a good breakfast.

 

(Showing his provisions.)

Shall prepare for us a good dinner.

 

The Prior (to Jean, inviting him).

To the table!

 

Jean (in ecstasy, hands beatifically

 

joined).

 

To the table !

 

All Three (with varying gestures).

To the table!

 

(The Prior, Boniface, the lay broth-

er with donkey, go toward entrance

of abbey. Jean follows them, still

hesitating, as if attracted by the

smell of the victuals. At the sill

he comes back to get his outfit of

jugglery, that he carries secretly,

before entering he makes humble

genuflection to the Virgin.)

 

 

 

SECOND ACT.

 

 

 

(At the Abbey, in the study room

which opens on the garden of the

convent. Tables, desks, stalls. Well

in sight. A statue of the Virgin,

newly finished, in a mystic attitude

of indulgence and love, which a

monk is at work coloring.- Grouped •

around the Musician Monk, other

monks finish rehearsing, under his

direction, a hymn to the Virgin

which he has composed for the oc-

casion; it is Assumption morning.)

 

All the Monks.

 

(The Musician Monk directs the vo-

cal ensemble and sings.)

 

Ave coeleste lilium,

Ave rosa speciosa,

Ave mater humitium

Superbis imperiosa

In hac valla lacrymarum

Do robur, fer auxilium.

 

Jean (dreaming alone).

The cooking is good at the convent.

 

 

 

I who did not dine often,

 

I drink good wine. I eat fat meats.

 

Glorious day.

 

The Virgin ascends, ascends to Heav-

en this day,

 

And for her they rehearse a song of

grace.

 

 

 

A song in Latin.

 

 

 

(Sadly.,

 

 

 

Queen of angels,

To you, to whom I owe fat meats and

 

good wines,

I should like with them to celebrate

 

your praise.

 

 

 

But I know not how to sing Latin.

 

The Prior (entering).

Brethren, it is very good.

 

(To the Musician Monk.)

I compliment the author.

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

(Au moine pobte, auteur des paroles

de I’hymne, et qui savance jaloux.)

 

Au poete aussi.

 

(Les movies reprennent chacun leur

place et leur travail; les uns peig-

nent, les autres sculptent ou modhl-

ent, d’autres copient sur velin, quel-

ques-uns au fond dans le jar din

bechenLet cultivent des fleurs, etc.

Dans un coin, modestetnent, Boni-

face epulche des legumes.)

 

Le Prieur (a Jean).

 

Mais, dans ce coin solitaire,

Senl, vous ne chantez pas, vous, un

ancien chanteur?

 

Jean.

 

Pardonnez-moi, mon pere;

Mais helas, je ne sais

Que profanes chansons en vulgaire

francais.

 

Plusieurs Moines (qui se sont

approches).

 

— Oh ! frere Jean ! — Quelle paresse !

— Voyez comme il engraisse!

 

(Lui touchant le ventre.)

 

— Sentez-vous son ventre pousser?

 

Boniface (intervenant avec bienveil-

 

lance).

 

Eh bien quoi! Frere Jean aime les

bonnes choses.

 

Le Prieur

 

A la Vierge, sans doute, il offre ce

 

matin.

Comme un bouquet, la fraicheur de

 

son teint

Tout fleuri de lis et de roses.

 

Les Moines.

 

(Le musicien, le pobte, le peintre et le

sculpteur.) ,

 

Frere Jean,

Dormez-vous…

 

Jean.

 

Mes freres, je connais ma triste in-

dignite.

 

 

 

Jour et nuit je la pleurt.

 

Vous me raillez, c’est peu. Vooc cotir •

 

roux, sur l’heure,

Devrait m’aneantir ; je l’ai bien merite.

 

Depuis qu’en ce couvent prospere

Me guidant de sa blanche main

La Vierge, secourable mere,

Permet que je mange a ma faim,

Ai-je un seul jour gagne mon pain?

Non, jamais ceuvre meritoire

Ne temoigne au ciel mon amour.

Moine ignorant, moine balourd,

Je ne sais rien qu’au refectoire

Boire et manger, manger et boire.

Chacun dans la sainte maison

Sert Notre-Dame d’un grand zele ;

II n’est pas si petit clergeon

Qui ne sache entonner pour elle

Verset ou psaume a la chapelle.

Et moi qui recevrais la mort

D’un coeur si joyeux pour sa gloire

Helas! helas! quel affreux sort,

 

Jean.

 

Je ne sais rien qu’au refectoire

Boire et manger, manger et boire.

 

Les Moines.

 

Jean ne sait rien qu’au refectoire

Boire et manger, manger et boire.

 

Jean (au Prieur).

 

Ah ! chassez-moi, mon Pere,

Je crains de vous porter malheur…

Allons, jongleur,

 

Reprends done ta besace, et reprends

ta misere !

 

Le Moine Sculpteur (sapprochant

 

de Jean).

 

Jongleur, piteux metier!

 

(Ironique.)

 

Deviens plutot sculpteur.

Tu seras mon eleve…

 

(Disignant la statuette qu f il est en

train de iailler au ciseau.)

 

Vois : des flancs du marbre se leve,

 

Eveille d’un ciseau pieux,

 

Le charme de la Reine au front deli-

 

cieux.

Je le cree a mon tour, moi, moi, sa

 

creature,

Gagnant la gloire avec les cieux.

Rien ne vaut la sculpture!

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

(To the Poet Monk, author of the

words, who steps forward jealous-

ly.)

 

The poet. too.

 

(The monks take up their work and

their places; sortie paint, others

model or chisel, others copy on vel-

lum, others at the end of the garden

spade and cultivate flowers. In a

comer, modestly, Boniface strips

vegetables.)

 

The Prior (to John).

 

But, in this solitary corner,

Alone, you do not sing, you, an old

singer ?

 

Jean.

 

Pardon me, my father;

But. alas. I only know

Profane songs in the vulgar French.

 

Several Monks (coming near).

 

— Oh, Brother Jean! how lazy!

— See how fat he is getting.

 

(Touching his stomach.)

— Feel how his stomach increases.

 

Boniface (intervening good

naturedly).

 

What of it! Brother Jean loves

good things.

 

The Prior.

 

To the Virgin, no doubt, he offers this

 

morning.

Like a bouquet, the freshness of his

 

complexion.

Colored with lilies and roses.

 

The Monks.

 

(The musician, the poet, the painter

and the sculptor.)

 

Brother Jean,

Do you sleep…

 

Jean.

 

Brethren. I know my sad indignity,

Day and night I lament it

 

 

 

You laugh at me, ’tis little. Your

  • anger, right here,

Should destroy me; I deserve it.

 

 

 

Since in this prosperous convent,

Guiding me by her white hand,

The Virgin, helpful mother,

Permits me to eat at my ease,

Have I once earned daily bread?

No, and not one work of merit

Testifies to Heaven my love.

Monk ignorant, monk stupid,

I go to the refectory.

Eat and drink, then, drink and eat,

Each one in this holy house

Serves Our Lady with great zeal;

Even the least little altar boy

Knows how fo sing to her,

Verse or song at the chapel.

And I willing to die

With joyous heart for her glory,

Alas, alas, what fearful fate!

 

Jean.

 

I know naught but in the refectory,

To eat and drink, to drink and eat.

 

The Monks.

 

Jean knows only in the refectory

To eat and drink, to drink and eat.

 

Jean (to the Prior).

 

Ah turn me away, my father.

I fear to bring you ill luck…

 

Come, juggler,

Take up your baggage and your mis-

ery.

 

The Sculptor Monk (to Jean).

Juggler, a poor trade.

 

(Ironically.)

 

Why not be a sculptor?

Thou shalt be my pupil.

 

(Showing the statue he is limning.)

 

Look: from the flanks of the marble

 

rises,

Wakened by a pious chisel,

The charm of the Queen with delicate

 

front,

I, iu my turn, create, I her creature,

Gaining glory with the heavens’,

Nothing equals sculpture!

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Le Moine Peintre (s’ appro chant).

 

Vous oubliez, mon frere, la peinture…

 

Sois mon eleve, Jean.

 

Le marbre inanime ne peut donner la

 

vie;

Mais sous le pinceau tout-puissant,

 

(Designant la Vierge peinte).

 

Tu la vois palpiter, fremissante, asser-

 

vie,

Aux levres qu’elle empourpre, aux

 

yeux dans le regard.

La Peinture,

Cest le grand art !

 

Le Moine Sculpteur.

 

Le grand art,

Cest la sculpture!

 

Le Moine Poete (approchant).

 

Non pas. A la place d’honneur

 

Ne doit s’asseoir que Poesie.

Cest ma Dame, et je suis son fervent

 

serviteur.

Votre art est bien grossier. D’essence

 

plus choisie,

Le poete, fixant le vol de Tesprit pur,

L’enferme tout vibrant aux vers d’or

 

et d’azur.

Gloire a la Poesie!

 

Le Moine Peintre.

 

La Peinture,

Cest le grand art !

 

Le Moine Sculpteur.

 

Le grand art,

Cest la Sculpture!

 

Le Prieur (intervenant).

Mes freres, calmons-nous.

 

Le Moine Musicien (approchant).

 

Pour moi, je me figure

 

Que mon art seul peut vous mettre

 

d’accord…

Voyez de quel ardent essor,

Tandis que vous rampez a terre,

La musique va droit au ciel!

Voix de rinexprimable, echo du grand

 

mystere,

Cest TOiseau Bleu qui vient du Rivage

 

Eternel,

 

 

 

Et c’est la Blanche Nef sur Tocean dv

 

Reve…

Que fait aux cieux un seraphin ?

II chante, encore, et toujours. et sail »

 

treve.

La musique est un art divin.

 

Le Moine Sculpteur.

Non, le grand art, c’est la sculpture.

 

 

Le Moine Peintre.

Non, le grand art, c’est la peinture^

 

Le Moine Poete.

Poesie, 6 reine des arts!

 

Le Moine Musicien.

O musique, reine des arts !

 

Un bavard, le poete !

 

Le Moine Peintre.

Des macons, les sculpteurs!

 

Le Moine Sculpteur.

Les peintres, des barboilleurs !

 

Jean (effraye).

Grand Dieu ! quelle tempete !

 

Le Moine Poete (ironique, au musi-

cien qui le menace).

 

La musique adoucit les mceurs !

 

(Tumulte.)

 

Le Prieur.

 

Quoi, mes freres, dans cet asile

 

La discordeL. Agitans discordia

 

fratres…

Cest le mot de Virgile.

Par ordre d’Apollon, par ordre du

 

Prieur,

Que la Muse a la Muse offre un baiser

 

de sceur.

 

(Les quatre rivaux s’embrassent f —

mais de mauvais gre.)

 

Et venez tous a la chapelle

Aux pieds de Notre-Dame, et plus

humbles de coeur,

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

The Painter Monk (approaching).

 

You forget, my brother, painting…

 

Be my pupil, Jean.

The inanimate marble cannot give life;

But under the all powerful brush,

 

(Showing the painted Virgin).

 

You see her palpitate, shudder, sub-

dued,

 

To the lips she empurples, to the eyes

in the look.

 

(Painting.)

It is the great art!

 

The Sculptor Monk.

 

The Great Art

Is sculpture!

 

The Poet Monk (approaching.)

 

Not so. In the place of honor

Only poetry must sit.

 

Tis my Lady, and I am her fervent

servitor,

 

Your art is very gross. Of choicer

essence,

 

The poet, fixing the flight of the spir-

it pure,

 

Encloses it vibrating to verses ot

heaven’s gold.

Glory to Poetry.

 

The Painter Monk.

 

Painting —

 

Is the Great Art!

 

The Sculptor Monk.

 

The Great Art

Is Sculpture.

 

The Prior (intervening).

Brethren, calm yourselves.

 

The Musician Monk (approaching)

 

For myself, I figure

 

That my art alone can make you

 

agree…

See with what ardent flight,

While you grovel on Earth

Music goes straight to Heaven.

Voice of the inexpressible, echo of the

 

great mystery,

Tis the Blue Bird that comes from

 

the Eternal Shore,

 

 

 

And ’tis the White Beam on the ocean

of Dreams.

 

What does a seraphim in heaven?

 

It sings, and again, and always, with-

out rest.

 

Music is a divine art.

 

The Sculptor Monk.

No, the great art is sculpture.

 

The Painter Monk.

No, the great art is painting.

 

The Poet Monk.

Poetry, oh queen of arts !

 

The Musician Monk.

Oh, Music, queen of arts!

 

A talker, the poet!

 

The Painter Monk.

Sculptors are only masons!

 

The Sculptor Monk.

Painters, mixers of color!

 

Jean (frightened).

Great God! what a tempest.

 

The Poet Monk (to the musician

who threatens him).

 

Music softens the manners.

 

(Tumult.)

 

The Prior.

 

What, my brethren, in this place

Discord!… Agitans discordia fratres…

‘Tis the saying of Virgil.

By order of Apollo, by order of the

 

Prior,

Let the Muse to the Muse offer the

 

kiss of a sister.

 

(The four rivals embrace with poor

grace.)

 

And come all to the cbapel,

To the feet of Our Lady, and more

humble of heart

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

La prier d’accueillir son Image nouv-

 

elle.

 

(Emportant la statue les moines se

retirent avant le PrieurJ

 

Jean (assis la tete dans ses mains).

Seul, je n’offre rien a Marie.

 

Boniface.

 

Va, frere Jean, ne les envie.

 

Tous, vois-tu, des orguelleux.

 

Et le Paradis, ca n’est pas pour eux.

 

Jean (dicouragi).

Le Paradis!

 

Boniface.

 

S’il faut s’enfler de gloire,

 

Quand je prepare un bon repas,

 

Je fais oeuvre aussi meritoire.

 

Sculpteur, je le suis en nougats;

Peintre, par la couleur si douce de

 

mes cremes;

Un chapon cuit a point vaut, seul,

 

mille poemes,

Et quelle symphonie a ravir terre et

 

cieux

Qu’une table ou preside un ordre har-

 

monieux !

 

Jean (tris convaincu).

Certainement.

 

Boniface (un pen fat).

 

Mais pour plaire a Marie,

Je reste simple.

 

Jean.

 

Simple, helas,

 

Je le suis trop… Elle aime qu’on la

 

prie

En ce Latin que je ne connais pas.

 

Boniface.

 

Et moi si peu… Latin de cuisine…

Est-ce la ton souci?

 

(Naivcment.)

 

La Vierge entend fort bien, va, le

 

f rancais aussi ;

Sa tendresse au besoin devine.

 

 

 

Pour les humbles Marie a des bow*&

 

de sceur;

Et j’ai lu dans un livreune historie

 

divine

Ou Ton voit clairement qu’elle a

 

donne son cceur

A la plus simple, a la plus humble

 

fleur.

 

(Racontant.)

 

“Marie avec TEnfant Jesus — par

les monts, par les plaines fuit…

 

“Mais Tane essouffle n’en peut plus ;

— et voici que la-bas, au versant de

la cote,— ont apparu soudain — les

sanglants cavaliers du Roi tueur d’en-

fants.

 

“O mon fils, ou cacher ta fai-

 

blesse !”

 

“Fleurissait une rose au bord du

chemin :

 

“Rose, belle rose, sois bonne: — a

mon enfant, pour s’y blottir, — ouvre

tout large ton calice; — sauve mon

Jesus de mourir.”

 

“Mais de peur de froisser l’incarnat

de sa robe, — Torgueilleuse repond:

“Je ne veux pas m’ouvrir.”

 

“Fleurissait une sauge au bord du

chemin :

 

“Sauge, ma petite saugette,— ouvre

ta feuille a mon enfant.”

 

“Et la bonne fleurette ouvre si bien

sa feuille — qu’au fond de ce berceau

Jesus va s’endormir…”

 

 

 

Jean (tendrement).

O miracle d’amour!

 

Boniface (achevant).

 

“Et la Vierge benie entre toutes

les femmes — a beni Thumble sauge

entre toutes les fleurs!”

 

(A part, tris convaincu.)

 

La sauge est en effet precieuse en

cuisine.

 

Jean (a part, les yeux au del, s’cxal-

 

tant).

 

Si votre blanche main me benissait un

 

jour!…

Vienne la mort, mourir sous vos yeux,

 

quelle fete!

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

21

 

 

 

Pray her to receive her new Image.

 

(Carrying the Statue the monks re-

tire before the Prior.)

 

Jean (seated head in hands.)

Alone, I offer nothing to Mary.

 

Boniface.

 

Go, brother Jean, envy them not

 

All, see you, proud ones.

 

And Paradise, it is not for them.

 

Jean (discouraged).

Paradise !

 

Boniface.

 

If one must swell with glory,

When I prepare a good repast,

I do meritoriously.

Sculptor, I am in paste.

 

Painter, by the color so soft of my

creams ;

 

A capon, cooked to a turn, is worth a

thousand poems,

 

And what a symphony to ravish heav-

en and earth

 

Is a table where presides harmonious

order !

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Certainly.

 

 

 

Boniface (fatuously).

 

But to please Marie

I remain simple.

 

 

 

Jean.

 

Simple, alas,

 

I am too much so. She loves to be

 

prayed to

In this Latin I do not know.

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

And I so little… Kitchen Latin…

Is that then your trouble.

 

(Naively.)

 

The Virgin understands the French

 

language, too;

Her goodness divinates want.

 

 

 

For the humble Marie is good as a

 

sister ;

And I read in a book a historv divine

Where one sees clearly that she gave

 

her heart

To the simplest, the most humble

 

flower.

 

(Telling a story.)

 

Mary with the infant Jesus, by

mountains and plains, fled… But the

winded ass could do no more; and

not far away, on the side of the hill, —

suddenly appeared — the bloody cav-

aliers of the King, the child killer.

 

“Oh my son, where hide thy weak-

ness !”

 

  • . • . . .

 

A rose was in flower on the road-

side:

 

“Rose, beautiful rose, be good: to

my child that he may hide, — open big

your calice; — save my Jesus from

death.”

 

But for fear of spoiling the crim-

son of her dress — the proud one re-

plied : “I will not open.”

 

A sageplant flowered on the way ;

 

“Sage, my little sage, — open thy

leaves to my child.”

 

And the good floweret opened so

wide her leaf — that in the bottom of

this cradle the child slept…”

 

Jean (tenderly).

Oh, miracle of love!

 

Boniface (finishing).

 

 

 

n

 

 

 

And the Virgin blessed among all

women — blessed the humble sage

among all the flowers !”

 

(Aside, quite convinced.)

 

Sage is in effect very precious in

cookery.

 

 

 

Jean (aside, eyes raised tozvard

Heaven).

 

If your white hand should bless me

some day…

 

Let death come. Die under your

eyes. What a holiday!

 

 

 

22

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

Nous feterons d’abord le diner que

 

j’apprete.

Mais je cours a mon dindonneau…

 

(Revenant).

 

Car je plais a la Vierge en veillant au

 

fourneau :

Jesus n’a-t-il pas, d’un egal sourire,

Recu des mages-rois Tor, l’encens et

 

la myrrhe,

Et du pauvre berger un air de chalu-

 

meau?

 

(II sort en courant.)

 

 

 

Jean (resie seul, repitant vaguement

les demibres paroles de Boniface).

 

Et du pauvre berger un air de chalu-

meau.

 

 

 

(Changeant de ton, et avec emotion.)

 

Quel trait de soudaine lumiere,

Et dans mon coeur quel emoi!

II a raison, la Vierge n’est pas fiere.

Le berger, le jongleur vaut a ses yeux

le roi.

 

 

 

(S’avancant, les yeux et les mains

vers le del.)

 

Vierge, mere d’amour, Vierge, bonte

 

supreme,

Comme a l’air du berger souriait

 

TEnfant-Dieu,

Si le jongleur osait vous honorer de

 

meme,

Daignez sourire au seuil des cieux!

 

(Jean reste dans cette attitude de mys-

tique invocation).

 

(L’orchestre joue la pastorale mys-

tique qui relie les deux actes.)

 

 

 

ACTE TROISIEME.

 

 

 

(Dans la chap ell e de Vabbaye. Men

en vue., sur I’autel, la statue peinte

de la Vierge. La chapelle est dis*

posee de telle sorte que, des cotes,

on puisse voir Jean sans qu’il aper-

coive lui meme ceux qui I observer-

ont.)

 

(Au loin, on entend les moines chan-

tant I’hymne de la Vierge. Le

Moine Peintre, seul devant la

statue.)

 

Le Moine Peintre.

 

Un regard, le dernier, a mon oeuvre,

 

a ma Vierge…

Le chant s’eloigne et meurt… Dans le

 

silence ou dort

L’immobile flamme des cierges,

Pour son peintre jaloux elle est plus

 

belle encor.

…Mais on entre. — Cest Jean… Pour-

 

quoi tout ce bagage?

 

(II se dissimule derriire une colonne.)

 

(Entree de Jean, encore vetu de sa

robe de moine, portant sa vikle et

sa besace de jongleur. II entre d

pas de loup, regardant partout avec

inquietude.)

 

Jean.

 

Personne… Allons, courage!

Nul, a cette heure, ne vient plus.

 

(S’approchant de Vautel.)

 

/Mere adorable de Jesus,

 

Blanche souveraine,

 

Me voila done seul devant vous…

Tremblant, le coeur plein d’amour et

 

de peine,

 

Je tombe a vos genoux…

 

Ecoutez ma priere:

Helas ! le pauvre Jean n’est rien qu’un

 

vil jongleur;

Laissez-le, cependant, a son humble

 

maniere,

Travailler sous vos yeux, 6 Vierge, en

 

votre honneur. /

 

(Dipouillant sa robe de moine, il ap-

parait en surcot de jongleur, etend

son tapis, et, saisissant sa vxtle, en

tire les memes accords qui annon*

caient sa venue sur la place de

Cluny.)

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

2a

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

We’ll celebrate first the dinner I pre-

pare.

I must run to my young turkey…

 

(Coming back.)

 

For I please the Virgin in looking to

the oven :

 

Hath not Jesus, with an equal smile

 

Received from the wise men gold, in-

cense and myrrh,

 

And from the poor shepherd a tune on

his pipe.

 

(Goes out running.)

 

(“Jean, alone, vaguely repeats the last

words of BonifaceJ

 

And from the poor shepherd an

air on his pipe.

 

 

 

(Changing his tone, with emotion.)

 

What a sudden ray of light,

And in my heart what joy.

He is right, the Virgin is not proud.

The shepherd, the juggler, in her

eyes, par the King.

 

(Advancing, eyes and hands toward

Heaven.)

 

Virgin, mother of love, Virgin good-

ness supreme,

 

As on the shepherd’s tune smiled the

God-Child,

 

If the juggler dared honor you the

same.

 

Deign to smile from the sill of

Heaven.

 

(Jean remains in an attitude of mys-

tic invocation.)

 

(The orchestra plays the mystic pas-

torale that unites the two acts.)

 

 

 

act in.

 

 

 

(In the chapel of the Abbey. In plain

sight, on the altar, the painted statue

of the Virgin. The chapel is so dis-

posed that, from the sides, one can

see Jean without his perceiving

those who observe him.)

 

(In the distance the monks sing the

hymn to the Virgin. The Painter

Monk is alone in front of the

statue.)

 

The Painter Monk.

 

One look, the last, at my work, at my

 

Virgin…

The chant is faint and dies… in the

 

silence where sleeps

The still flame of the tapers,

For her painter, jealous, she is finer

 

yet.

…One enters. — Tis… Why all this

 

baggage ?

 

(He hides behind a column.)

 

(Entrance of Jean, still in his monk’s

robe, carrying his viele and jug-

gler’s paraphernalia. He enters on

tip-toe, looking about him anxious-

ly.)

 

Jean.

 

No one… Come, courage!

 

None, at this hour, comes any more.

 

(Approaching the altar.)

 

Adorable mother of Jesus,

 

White sovereign,

 

Here am I alone before you…

Trembling, my heart full of love and

 

trouble.

 

I fall at your knees…

Listen to my prayer:

Alas, poor Jean is naught but a vile

 

juggler ;

Yet let him, in his humble manner,

Work under your eyes, oh Virgin, in

 

your honor.

 

(Taking off his monk’s robe, he ap-

pears in the vest of a juggler,

spreads his carpet and, seising his

viele, draws from it the tones that

announced his arrival at the Square

of Cluny.)

 

 

 

24

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Le Moine Peintre.

 

II devient fou. Je cours avertir le

Prieur.

 

(11 sort vivement.)

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Je commence.

 

 

 

(II salue la Vierge.)

 

Place, place, silence!

 

Ecoutez Jean, rot des jongleurs.

 

(EntrainS par Vhabitude, il parcourt,

la sebile a la main, un cercle de

spectateurs imaginaires.)

 

Mais dans ma sebile d’avance

Quelques sols…

 

(S’arretant con f us, a la Vierge.)

 

L’habitude ! Pardon .

 

(Reprenant son boniment.)

 

Attention !…

 

Pour vous plaire,

Je chante une Chanson de guerre.

“II fait beau voir ces hommes d’armes,

Quand ils sont montes et bardes ;

II fait beau voir luire ces armes

Dessous les 6tendards dores.

Pour gagner gloire et belle terre.

Entre nous, gentils compagnons,

 

Suivons la guerre ! J

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean (& part).

 

Mais ce vacarme, a la Vierge fait

fpeur.

 

(S’adressant d la Vierge, naivement.)

 

Vous preferez peut-etre

La Romance d’amour?

 

(II entonne la romance connue a oeHe

epoque.)

 

“Belle Doette a sa fenetre…”

 

(La memoire lux manque; a part.)

 

Je ne sais plus.

 

(Commencant une autre.)

 

“…Belle Erembourg

Sur la plus haute tour…”

 

(La mf moire lui manque de nouveau.)

 

 

 

Ah! memoire infideleL.

Eh bien, rabache alors, imbecile his-

trion,

 

L’eternelle

 

Pastourelle

De Robin et Marion.

“A Tore’ du joli bocage

 

— Saderaladon,

Chante, rossignolet —

Marion, pastoure bien sage,

 

Pense toujours

 

A ses amours.

 

. Ae!

“Vient a passer, fier sous Tarmure,

 

— Saderaladon,

Chante, rossignolet —

Chevalier de belle figure:

 

“Je suis le roi,

 

Sois toute a moi.”

Ae!

“Non, beau seigneur, je reste sage,

 

— Saderaladon,

Chante, rossignolet —

Avec ma cotte et mon fromage,

 

Toute a Robin,

 

J’aime Robin.”

Ae, ae!

 

(Pendant que Jean chante cette pas-

tourelle f le Prieur, conduit par le

Moine peintre, arrive avec Boni-

face. Jean ne pent les apercevoir;

ils observent le manege du jongleur,

Plusieurs fois, le Prieur scandalisi

fait mine de se precipiter sur Jean;

mais Boniface le retient.)

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Sacrilege !

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

Moins de furie!

La fin de la chanson

Catholiquement marie

La fille avec le garcon.

 

(Entrent Tous Les Moines./

 

Jean (sur le modellc d’un rapidc boni-

ment).

 

Et maintenant, voulez-vous tours de

 

jonglerie,

Voire de sorcellerie?

Faut-il dans les airs brulants,

Evoquer griffons et diables volants?

 

(S f arret ant. hontcux de ce sacrilege;

& la Vierge.)

 

 

 

\

 

\

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

The Painter Monk.

 

He gets mad. I run to warn the

Prior.

 

(He goes out hastily.)

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

f begin.

 

 

 

(He bows to the Virgin.)

 

Room, make room, silence!

Listen to Jean, I am the King of

jugglers.

 

  • ••*..

 

(Carried away by habit, he goes

around, cup in hand, a circle of im-

aginary spectators.)

 

But in my cup first

A few pennies…

 

(Stopping, confused, to the Virgin.)

‘Tvvas my habit! Forgive me.

 

(Resuming his jollying.)

 

Attention !…

 

To please you,

 

I sing a song of war.

 

“It is fine to see these men at arms

 

When in saddle accoutred;

 

It is fine to see these arms

 

Under the golden standards.

 

To gain glory and fine land

 

Between us, gentle companions,

 

Let us follow war!”

 

Jean (aside).

 

But all this noise frightens the Vir-

gin.

 

(Addressing the Virgin, simply.)

 

You prefer, perhaps,

The Romance of Love?

 

(He starts the romance known at that

epoch.)

 

“Pretty Doette at her window…”

 

(Memory fails him; aside.)

 

I forget it.

 

(Beginning another.)

 

“Pretty Erembourg

On the highest tower…”

 

(Memory fails him again.)

 

 

 

Oh treacherous memory…

 

Well then, back again, stupid his-

 

trion,

To the eternal

Pastoral

 

Of Robin and Marion.

To the ear of the pretty shrubbery

— Saderaladon,

Sing little nightingale —

Marion, proper country wench,

Always thinks

Of her loves.

Ae!

Haps to pass proud in armour

 

Saderaladon —

Sing little nightingale —

A horseman of fine mien.

“I am the King.

Be all to me.”

Ae!

“No, dear Lord, I will stay good,

 

— Saderaladon,

Sing, little nightingale —

With my hut and my cheese

I belong to Robin,

I love Robin.”

 

Ae! Ae!

 

(While Jean sings the Pastoral, the

Prior, led by the painter monk, ar-

rives with Boniface. Jean cannot

see them; they observe the play of

the juggler. Several times, the

Prior scandalized, wants to throw

himself on Jean but is held back

by Boniface. )

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Sacrilege !

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

Less fury.

 

The end of the song.

Catholicly marries

The girl to the boy.

 

(All the monks enter.)

 

Jean (on the model of a quick jolly).

 

And now will you have turns at jug-

glery,

Or something of sorcery ?

Shall I in the flaming air

Evoke griffins and flying devils ?

 

(Stopping, ashamed of this sacrilege to

the Virgin.)

 

 

 

26

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Pardon, Thabitude !

 

(Se rapprochant de la Vierge, et en

confidence.)

 

Entre nous, j’exagere!

 

Mais vous savez qu’un boniment

 

N’est jamais absolument

 

Sincere.

 

(Reprenont.)

 

Attention ! pour finir la seance,

J’aurai Thonneur de danser devant

vous.

 

(Avec humilite.)

 

Tout simplement la danse de chez

nous.

 

Le Prieur (pret d s’Slancer).

Ah! je cours…

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

Patience !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

A son vomissement vois retourner

le chien.

 

Boniface.

 

Devant l’arche dansa le roi David.

le pense,

Que David n’etait pas paien.

 

(Le jongleur se met a danser une

sorte de bourree avec des appels de

pied et des exclamations jetees par

intervalles. II damse de plus en

plus vite, jusqu’au moment oft hale-

tant, il tombe aux pied’s de la Vierge

et /y prosterne dans une longue et

profonde adoration.)

 

(Les Moines & part, en contrast e de

coUre avec la danse du jongleur.)

 

 

 

\

 

 

 

Les Moines.

 

 

 

Sacrilege !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Anatheme !

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

/

 

 

 

Pitie!

 

 

 

\

 

 

 

Les Moines.

 

Pourceau couvert de boue,

II se vautre et se joue

Dans son impiete.

 

 

 

(Danse du jongleur.)

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Anatheme !

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

Pitie !

 

 

 

Les Moines.

 

 

 

Quelle insulte

 

Vengeance !

 

A la Mere de Dieu!

 

Chassons-le

 

Vile eng^ance!

Chassons-le du saint lieu!

 

Boniface.

Pitie, pitie pour lui !

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Anatheme !

 

 

 

Les Moines.

 

Sacrilege !

Mort a Timpie !

 

(Furieux, Les Moines vont se pri-

cipiter sur Jean. Mais Boniface,

d’un geste vers la statue de la

Vierge, les arrete.)

 

Boniface.

 

Arriere tous,

 

La Vierge le protege!

 

Le tableau… voyez-vous… voye*

vous…

 

D’une etrange lumiere

 

II commence a briller…

Un doux regard se leve au bord de la

 

paupiere,

Sur la bouche un sourire est pres de

 

s’eveiller.

 

 

 

Les Moines.

 

 

 

O miracle !

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

Forgive me, the force of habit!

 

(Getting nearer to the Virgin and in

confidence.)

 

Between ourselves, I exaggerate !

But you know that a jolly

Is never absolutely

Sincere.

 

(Resuming.)

 

Attention ! to finish the seance

I shall have the honor to dance be-

fore you.

 

(With humility.)

Simply the dance we have at home.

 

The Prior (ready to interfere).

Ah, I run…

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

Patience !

 

 

 

The Prior,

The dog returns to his vomit.

 

Boniface.

 

Before the ark danced King David.

I believe that David was no pagan.

 

(The juggler begins to dance a coun-

try step with taps of feet and cries

at intervals. He dances faster and

faster, until the moment when, out

of breath, he falls at the feet of the

Virgin and prostrates himself in a

long and profound adoration.)

 

(The monks aside, their anger con-

trasting with the juggler’s dance.)

 

The Monks.

f

 

 

 

Sacrilege !

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Anathema !

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

Pity!

 

 

 

The Monks.

 

Swine, covered with mud,

He wallows and mocks

In his impiety.

 

(Dance of the Juggler.)

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Anathema !

 

 

 

Boniface.

 

 

 

Pity!

 

 

 

The Monks.

 

What insult…

Vengeance !

 

To the Mother of Heaven !

Let us hunt him.

Vile work.

Hunt him from this holy place!

 

Boniface.

Pity, pity for him!

 

The Prior.

Anathema !

 

The Monks.

 

Sacrilege !

 

Death to the impious!

 

(Furious, the monks are about to

throw themselves on Jean. But

Boniface, by a gesture toward the

statue of the Virgin, stops them.)

 

Boniface.

 

Get behind, all,

 

The Virgin protects him!

 

The picture… do you see… do you

see…

 

With a strange light

 

It begins to shine…

A gentle glance is rising on the edge

 

of the eyelid,

On the mouth a smile begins to be

 

seen.

 

The Monks.

Oh, miracle !

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Le Moine Peintre (radieux

d’orgueil).

 

O peinture!

 

Boniface.

 

Ah ! voyez… la main blanche

 

Vers le jongleur incline un geste ma-

 

ternel…

Le front delicieux avec amour se

 

penche…

 

Les Moines.

O miracle !

 

(On entend des voix cilestes.)

 

Boniface.

Ecoutez les musiques du Ciel.

 

Les Voix Des Anges Invisibles.

 

Hosannah ! Gloire a Jean. Hosannah !

 

Gloire, gloire.

Gloire au plus haut des cieux. Gloire

 

et serenite!

 

Paix sur la terre

Aux hommes de bonne volonte.

 

 

 

b

 

 

 

Les Moines.

 

Adorable mystere.

 

(Le Prieur, suivi des Moines, s’ap-

proche de Jean, toujours aux pieds

de la Vierge, abime dans sa pribre.

Jean se relive et se retourne au

bruit, effrayi d’etre surpris dans

son costume de jongleur.)

 

Jean.

 

Cest le Prieur !

 

 

 

Pardon !

 

 

 

(Tombant a genoux.)

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Relevez-vous,

 

Cest a moi d’etre a vos genoux.

Vous etes un grand saint. Priez,

priez pour nous.

 

Les Moines.

Priez pour nous.

 

Jean (croyant qu’on le raille).

 

Non, ne me raillez point. Punissez-

moi, mon pere.

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

Vous railler, vous punir,

Vous, Thonneur de ce monasere.

 

(Designant Vautel.)

 

Quand je vois de mes yeux la

Vierge vous benir!

 

 

 

Jean (trbs simplement) .

Je ne vois rien.

 

Les Moines.

Etrange merveille !

 

 

 

■*\

 

 

 

Le Prieur.

 

 

 

Enseignement des cieux, et lecon non

 

pareille

De candide vertu, de sainte humilite.

 

‘ (S’adressant d la Vierge.)

 

Mais cependant, 6 Vierge souveraine.

Mere d’amour et de bonte,

Pour le delasser de sa peine,

 

Aux yeux fermes encor de votre cher

jongleur

 

Revelez-vous, divine et vivante Paleur.

 

(Vautel, jusque-la faiblement eclaire,

s’illumine alors d’un intense eclat.

Et, se detachment des mains de la

Vierge, Vauriole des bien-heureux

 

| vient briller sur la tete de Jean J

 

Les Moines.

Miracle ! Miracle !

 

 

 

Jean (comme frappc an cocur).

 

Rayonnement,

 

Bonheur,

Delicieusement

 

Je meurs.

 

(II de faille entre les bras du Prieur.;

 

i Les Moines (tombant a genoux).

 

I Kyrie, Eleison,

 

I Christe exaudi nos,

 

/ Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis.

 

 

 

LE JONGLEUR DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

The Painter Monk (radiant with

 

pride.)

 

Oh Painting.

 

Boniface.

 

Ah, see… the white hand

 

Toward the juggler inclines with ma-

ternal gesture…

 

The delicate forehead, with love, bends

 

 

 

down…

 

 

 

The Monks.

 

 

 

Oh Painting!

 

(Celestial voices are heard.)

 

Boniface.

Listen to the music of heaven.

 

Voices of Invisible Angels.

 

Hosannah ! Glory to Jean. Hosannah !

 

Glory, glory.

Glory in highest of Heaven. Glory

and serenity!

 

Peace on Earth,

  • To men of good will.

 

The Monks.

Adorable mystery.

 

(The Prior, followed by the monks,

approaches Jean, still at the feet of

the Virgin, lost in prayer. Jean

rises and turns about at the noise,

fearful at being surprised in his cos-

tume of juggler.)

 

Jean.

 

It is the Prior!

 

(falling on his knees.)

 

 

 

Pardon !

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

 

 

Rise,

 

‘Tis for me to be at your knees.

You are a great saint. Pray, pray

for us.

 

The Monks.

 

Pray for us.

 

Jean (thinking they mock him).

 

No, do not mock me. Punish me,

my father.

 

 

 

The Prior.

 

Mock you, punish you.

 

You, the honor of the monastery.

 

 

(Pointing to the altar,)

 

When I see with my eyes the Vir-

gin bless you!

 

Jean (very simply).

I see nothing.

 

The Monks.

Strange marvel!

 

The Prior.

 

Teaching from heaven, lesson with-

out equal,

Of candid virtue, of holy humility.

 

(Addressing the Virgin.)

 

But yet, oh sovereign Virgin,

Mother of love and goodness,

To ease him of his trouble,

To the still closed eyes of your dear

 

juggler

Reveal yourself, divine and living

 

Pallor.

 

(The altar, hitherto dimly lighted, is

illumined by an intense light. And,

detaching itself from the hands of

the Virgin, the nimbus of the chos-

en sparkles over the head of Jean J

 

The Monks.

Miracle! Miracle!

 

Jean (as if stricken in the heart).

 

Light,

Happiness,

Delightfully

I die.

 

(He faints in the arms of the Prior.,)

 

The Monks (falling on their knees).

 

Kyrie Elcison,

 

Christe exandi nos,

 

Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis.

 

 

 

30 LE JONGLEUR

 

Jean (se soulevant d demi, d’un ton

naif et tendrc).

Enfin!

Je comprends le Latin.

 

(II retombe.)

 

Les Voix De Deux Anges

Invisibles.

 

 

 

Alleluia !

Caresse du vent de nos ailes,

Souriant, le jongleur s’endort.

Voyez devant son humble zele

S’ouvrir aux cieux la porte d’or.

Sur le front nimbe de lumiere,

Effeuillez-vous, bleuets et lis.

Parmi Tencens et la priere,

Semons’ les fleurs du Paradis.

 

Alleluia !

 

(II neige des bleuets et des lis.)

(Nuages d’encens.)

 

Les Moines (recitant les litanies).

 

Mater purissima,

Mater castissima,

Mater inviolata,

Ora pro nobis.

 

(La Vierge commence a monter lente-

mcnt an Ciel; on la voit ensuite, en-

touree des Anges, au milieu du Par-

adis.)

 

Jean (prcs de mourir, en extase).

 

Spectacle radieux!

 

Je vois s’ouvrir les cieux !…

 

 

 

DE NOTRE DAME

 

 

 

Parfums divins… frais palpitements

 

d’ailes…

Aux pres d’azur, fleuris de corolles

 

nouvelles,

Sous les yeux de Marie et de TEnfant

 

Jesus

Je vois passer la ronde fraternelle

Des cherubins et des elus…

 

La Vierge, de la main, me fait signe…

 

je viens…

Quel doux sourire… oh! sa main

 

blanche…

 

Boniface (avec une ardente et ra~

 

dieuse piete).

Delivre des terrestres liens,

II s’envole au bonheur de reternel

 

Dimanche…

Plus de chagrin, plus de souci…

II entre en la celeste ronde…

 

 

 

Jean.

 

 

 

Me void!…

 

 

 

(II meurt.)

 

 

 

Le Prieur (recitant).

 

Heureux les simples, car ils verront

Dieu.

 

Les Voix Des Anges.

Amen!

 

Les Moines.

 

Amen!

FIN.

    Leave Your Comment Here